Work by a graffiti artist depicting the torso of a superman-style character pulling back his shirt to reveal a costume bearing the letters ‘NHS’.
'Untitled' - graffiti thanking the NHS during the COVID-19 lockdown. © Lionel Stanhope. Source: Historic England Archive, image reference HEC01/036/01/099.
'Untitled' - graffiti thanking the NHS during the COVID-19 lockdown. © Lionel Stanhope. Source: Historic England Archive, image reference HEC01/036/01/099.

Introduction to Issue 18

John Cattell, our National Head of Research introduces this portmanteaux issue, in which we examine a photographic collection, built heritage, archaeology, methodologies and scientific techniques.

In this portmanteaux issue, we examine a photographic collection, built heritage, archaeology, methodologies and scientific techniques.
The COVID-19 pandemic is one of the greatest challenges to have faced Britain since the Second World War. The first article ‘Picturing Lockdown or Feeling Lockdown?’ by Dr Annebella Pollen and Dr Paul Lowe explores an archive collection of images generated by the public that seeks to capture this tragic yet historic time-and the emotions that it invokes- for posterity.

In ‘Historic Character and Good Design’, David McOmish and Dave Hooley describe the positive role that historic characterisation methodologies can play in informing decisions about sympathetic change and placemaking.

Emily Hathaway and Jeremy Lake report on a project commissioned by Historic England- ‘Adding a New Layer’ of much-needed information about 20th-century heritage to Worcestershire Historic Environment Record.

Gill Campbell and Jen Heathcote explain the benefits for heritage in knowledge gained by ‘Investing in Scientific Research’; specifically, new equipment at our Fort Cumberland laboratories.

Wellbeing is a great concern of our 21st century society, ever more so because of the extra strain of the pandemic. In ‘Heritage and Social Prescribing’ Desi Gradinarova looks at how we can unleash the wellbeing potential of heritage.

Lastly, with ‘Coinage and Ritual Deposition’ at Stanwick, Northamptonshire, Richard Henry shares with us a preview of the analysis of one of the biggest rural Roman Coin Assemblages from Roman Britain and explains what it can tell us about the economy and beliefs of the period.

John Cattell

National Head of Research at Historic England

John has worked for Historic England and its predecessors since 1989 in a variety of roles including Chief Buildings Historian and Research Director. He is now responsible ​for developing and leading the organisation's national research work. John is also responsible for Historic England's relationships with the Research Councils and leading on Independent Research Organisation engagement.

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