October is Black History Month

From the first public sculptures of Black Britons to the home of Britain’s first West Indian newspaper, we’re celebrating the Black histories of 31 places in England and the accomplishments of those associated with them.

A new place will be added to the map each day this month

Day 27: 'The Gilt of Cain', Fen Court, City of London

Unveiled by Archbishop Desmond Tutu in 2008 to mark the bicentenary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade, this sculpture was created by Michael Visocchi in collaboration with poet Lemn Sissay.

Read more about 'The Gilt of Cain.'



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

Day 2: Bristol Bus Boycott and the Bus Boycott

The Bristol Bus Boycott of 1963 arose from the refusal of the Bristol Omnibus Company to employ non-white people in the city's bus crews.

Read more about Bristol Bus Boycott and the Bus Boycott



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

Day 14: Sarah Forbes Bonetta at Windsor Castle

Sarah was born a princess in Africa but was enslaved through warfare between African states. Once freed, she became a protégé of Queen Victoria after being introduced to the Court at Windsor Castle.

Read more about Sarah Forbes Bonetta



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

Day 8: The Empire Windrush

The Empire Windrush, the ship that has given its name to a whole generation of West Indians who sought a new life in Britain, arrived at Tilbury Docks, on 22 June 1948.

Read more about The Empire Windrush



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

Day 12: John Blanke and Greenwich Palace

John Blanke is thought to be the first Black Briton who can be identified by a name and possibly a face. He was a Black trumpeter who arrived in Tudor England as part of the entourage of Catherine of Aragon.

Read more about John Blanke and Greenwich Palace



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

Day 5: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor at the Royal College of Music

Renowned Black composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, called by some contemporaries “The Black Mahler”, joined the Royal College of Music in London in 1890. He was one of the first Black students at the College.

Read more about Royal College of Music



Each day during Black History Month, we’ll plot a new place on a map and highlight why each is significant. When complete, the map will celebrate places where history happened and honour the great contribution Black Britons have made to our vibrant and diverse society.

Discover the places

What's Happening Near You?

See what's happening in your local historic environment and find out how you can help uncover the hidden stories behind your local heritage.

📍 East of England     📍 London     📍 Midlands     📍 North East
📍 North West     📍 South East     📍 South West     📍 Yorkshire

Union Chain Bridge. View from Scottish side towards England. © Leon Walsh

Mapped: Heritage at Risk in England

We've identified the sites that are most at risk of being lost as a result of neglect, decay or inappropriate development.

Heritage Should Be for Everyone

Our heritage and our built environment should be a source of knowledge and understanding for everyone.

We condemn racism in any form. We are committed to inclusion, diversity and equality of opportunity in all of our work - but we know that we, and the heritage sector, have a long way to go.

We will work to ensure that Black lives, past and present, are fully recognised as part of our nation’s history, and our sector’s future.

Read our full statement

The Slave Trade and Abolition

Black people have been part of British history since Roman times. They worked as servants, musicians, trades people and businessmen. Some, but not all, were enslaved.

Britain's involvement in the slave trade was most active from the late 16th to early 19th centuries. The buildings and memorials around us tell us about those who grew wealthy on this trade in human lives, as well as those who campaigned to end slavery.

These people, from a range of backgrounds, all left their mark on history.

Learn more

6 Places That Tell Stories of the Windrush Generation

The arrival of the Windrush generation in 1948 marked the dawn of modern multicultural Britain. On the Heritage Calling blog we take a look at their story through six important locations in England.

Read the blog

Heritage Online Debate: Workplace Diversity

What are the challenges and also opportunities for the heritage sector to embracing diversity and creating inclusive places to work?

To start this debate, we have asked a number of prominent people to write their thoughts.

Why is a Diverse Workplace Essential?

Connecting People and Places

Historic England and the Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust want to inspire young people from Black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds to pursue a career in architecture.

Students researched buildings that have significant importance for members of the BAME community. They found out how these places and buildings have shaped history and added value to their individual communities.

Explore their research

Mapping 100 Years of Black and Asian History

Between 1918 and 2018 there has been enormous global change and waves of migration. The century has seen Black and Asian people influence England's culture, industry, economy, and national life as never before.

'Another England' followed the histories of people arriving from countries in Africa, South and East Asia and the Caribbean. The project explores the reasons people came, including two world wars and established colonial and trade links.

Discover 'Another England'

Enrich the List

The List has over 400,000 entries: tower blocks and tombstones, barrows and bunkers, palaces and pigsties, plague crosses and piers, cathedrals, windmills and rollercoasters.

Many places on the List are well-known and even world-famous. But in some cases there is much that remains unknown.

We invite you to share your knowledge and pictures of listed places, so we can record important facts, and even unlock the secrets of some places.

Find out how to make your contribution

Revitalising your High Street

68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic.

£95 million will unlock the potential of 68 high streets

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones

48% of the nation's retail stock was built before 1919

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones

Empty historic buildings risk the character, identity and viability of the high street

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones

Disused and dilapidated buildings will be transformed and restored

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones

Cultural activities will engage communities with their high streets

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones

Find out more about High Streets Heritage Action Zones

From Plymouth to Hexham, 68 historic high streets across England have been offered £95 million government funding to give them a new lease of life and help them recover from declining footfall and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These projects will now progress to the next stage of development and the partners will work with us to develop plans to revive their high streets.

High Streets Heritage Action Zones