Red tiled tube station. Signs along the top of the building read (left to right):
Exit - Underground -  Kilburn - Park - Underground - Entrance
Kilburn Park station, Cambridge Avenue, London © Charles Watson
Kilburn Park station, Cambridge Avenue, London © Charles Watson

Leslie Green, Architect of London Underground

Leslie Green (6 February 1875 – 31 August 1908) was born in London and instrumental in changing the city for generations to come.

He established his architectural practice in 1897 and was appointed six years later as architect for the Underground Electric Railways Company of London.

Commission of a lifetime

Green was commissioned to design 50 new stations. The stations would mostly be two-storey steel-framed buildings. All would require a large internal area and be finished in ox-blood red terracotta blocks. The flat roof design was essential as it encouraged development above and over the building. For the complete picture of the influence of Green's work we have included Maida Vale and Kilburn. Although completed after his death, they so closely resemble his designs we wanted to include them.

In 1905 his health started to suffer as the stress of undertaking an enormous project took its toll. In 1907 he could no longer continue. He died in 1908 at the age of 33.

Green's legacy is cemented as the man who painted London red.

Leslie Green stations protected by listing

* For the complete picture of the influence of Greens work we've included Maida Vale and Kilburn. Although they were completed after his death, they very closely resemble his designs.

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